Future of IPv6 Networks and Design

Future of IPv6 Networks and Design

Guest blog post by Nish Vamadevan

The future of the Internet Backbone solely depends on IPv6, there is no doubt that IPv6 will eventually be the de-facto Internet routing protocol of the 21st century. Since the start of IPv6 evolution, we took for granted the real need for an enhanced IP Protocol and continued to concentrate on developing IPv4 networks. Sadly, it is still the case that a significant number of operators are still concentrating on developing IPv4 networks. Over the years, ARIN and a number of organizations have promoted the need for IPv6 adoption; and there has been tremendous success in getting the majority of the Internet community to consider and transition their core networks to IPv6.

Transitioning a core network to IPv6 is not an easy task. It takes great planning and implementation. Once it is done, the network will be solid, and for the major part of it there is no need for a redesign. When it comes to IPv6 implementation, it is better to go with the statement “plan thrice, implement once”. Planning any network is crucial, but when it comes to IPv6 deployment, there are a few aspects that need to be looked into.

The first thing one should look at is the IPv6 Deployment Guide by 6net and go over and understand the concept of IPv6 from a vendor independence point of view along with having a look at ARIN’s IPv6 Info Center.

https://www.arin.net/knowledge/ipv6_info_center.html

http://www.6diss.org/publications/info/deployment-guide.pdf

This is a critical part of design, because when it comes to implementation, all vendors have their own way of looking at things. A company or a service provider, who wants to deploy IPv6, should pick the approach that is best for them rather than taking the vendor’s suggestion. This falls into the category of “Planning Ahead”. If you take the wrong approach in planning, you are definitely going to end up facing problems in the future.

A major aspect to think about when it comes to IPv6 design is the interoperability with the IPv4 networks. In an ideal world, everyone will run on IPv6 backbone and there is no need for a 6to4 infrastructure, but in reality that is not the case. Therefore, one should consider and evaluate how they are going to talk to the IPv4 network. This is an interesting part of design. As time goes by, you can gradually take down chunks of networks that handle IPv6 to IPv4 traffic as the networks evolve towards an IPv6 core. In the long run, you will end up cutting costs.

All these cannot be done without having solid background knowledge and experience in deploying IPv6 networks from a practical point of view. Companies and service providers should encouraging their technical staff to participate in courses and special training so when it comes to deploying their network, it will be a smooth and easy transition.

:Nish Vamadevan

Network Design Engineer

Blog: http://www.nish.com

Any views, positions, statements or opinions of a guest blog post are those of the author alone and do not represent those of ARIN. ARIN does not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or validity of any claims or statements made by a guest blog post. ARIN shall not be liable for any representations, omissions or errors contained in a guest blog post.

Post written by:

Jennifer Bly
External Relations Manager

Any views, positions, statements or opinions of a guest blog post are those of the author alone and do not represent those of ARIN. ARIN does not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or validity of any claims or statements, nor shall ARIN be liable for any representations, omissions or errors contained in a guest blog post.

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