The 12 Days of IPv6: Day 4, IPv6 - A Misunderstood Protocol

The 12 Days of IPv6: Day 4, IPv6 - A Misunderstood Protocol

: We know there is a lot of misinformation circulating about IPv4 and IPv6, and many CIOs and CTOs don’t have a clear understanding of why they need to adopt the IPv6 standard. Fortunately, we were able to turn to Carolyn Duffy Marsan’s article in Network World last February, “The 6 Biggest Misconceptions about IPv6,” to set the record straight on some of the biggest IPv6 myths.

Fiction: The Internet still has plenty of IPv4 addresses.

Fact: The IPv4 free pool has depleted and the five RIRs, including ARIN, are handing out their final IPv4 addresses.

Fiction: My company doesn’t need to adopt IPv6 yet.

Fact: All companies that do business over the Internet should support IPv6 or risk losing potential customers.

Fiction: A lucky Internet user will get the last IPv4 address.

Fact: Carriers will share IPv4 addresses and recycle unused IPv4 addresses so there will be no single ‘last’ IPv4 address.

Fiction: A black market will emerge for IPv4 addresses.

Fact: Because all the RIRs:ARIN included:have created legal ways for organizations to transfer their unused IPv4 addresses, these transactions are part of a legitimate market.

Fiction: IPv6 is more secure than IPv4.

Fact: For the short term only, IPv6 will be less secure than IPv4 because we’re testing out a new code all over the Internet.

Fiction: IPv6 will make the Internet simpler.

Fact: While we all transition to the new protocol, IPv4 and IPv6 will coexist for years, making network management more complex for the foreseeable future.

Check back with us tomorrow for Day 5 of the 12 Days of IPv6, as we discuss why recycling IPv4 addresses won’t delay the transition to the next-generation Internet.

Post written by:

Jennifer Bly
External Relations Manager

Recent articles categorized under: IPv6


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