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Request Resources

Where to Start?

The instructions below refer to requesting new Internet number resources from ARIN, which can include IP addresses or Autonomous System Numbers (ASNs). Please review some of the general guidelines below and then refer to the specific instructions for the type of resources you would like to request.

Before You Begin

All resource requests require an ARIN Online account linked to either an Admin or Tech Point of Contact (POC) record with the authority to request resources for a valid Organization Identifier (Org ID).

Qualifying for Resources

Organizations requesting IP addresses or ASNs directly from ARIN should first review the applicable policy requirements to verify they qualify for the resources. Once you have verified you meet the applicable policy requirements, submit your request.

What You'll Need

As part of the request process, ARIN requires specific types of documentation to ensure requests meet the requirements set by policy. Explanations of the type of documentation that may be required, as well as examples, are provided on the website.

Out of Region Use

ARIN registered resources may be used outside the ARIN service region for organizations with a real and substantial connection with the ARIN region. For details, please see Number Resource Policy Manual (NRPM) Section 9. To view the ARIN service region, visit the ARIN Region page.

Select which type of resource you are requesting to jump to that section:

IP Addresses

An Internet Protocol address (IP address) is a numerical label assigned to each device (e.g., computer, printer) participating in a computer network that uses the Internet Protocol for communication.

Note: This section refers to IP version 6 (IPv6) addresses, as ARIN has reached IPv4 exhaustion. For instructions on how to obtain IPv4 address space, visit the Request IPv4 Addresses page.

ISP Allocations

ARIN allocates blocks of IP addresses to Local Internet Registries (LIRs), which are generally Internet Service Providers (ISPs), for the purpose of reassigning that space to their customers.

For policy information, see Number Resource Policy Manual (NRPM) Section 6.5.2.

For fee information, see ARIN's Fee Schedule.

Initial Requests
Standard: /32 minimum, /36 upon request (see NRPM 6.5.2)

Meet one of the following requirements:

  • Have a previously-justified IPv4 ISP allocation from ARIN or one of its predecessor registries
  • Qualify for an IPv4 ISP allocation under current policy
  • Intend to immediately IPv6 multi-home
  • Provide a reasonable technical justification, including a plan showing projected assignments for periods of one, two, and five years, with a minimum of 50 assignments within five years
Multiple Discrete Networks: /32 minimum, /36 upon request (see NRPM 6.11)

Meet one of the following requirements:

  • Be a single entity and not a consortium of smaller independent entities
  • Have compelling criteria for creating discrete networks, such as regulatory restrictions for data transmission, geographic distance and diversity between networks, and autonomous multi-homed discrete networks
  • Show that each discrete network meets the standard IPv6 initial allocation criteria
Additional Requests (see NRPM 6.5.3)

Meet one of the following requirements:

  • Demonstrate at least 75% utilization of your IPv6 allocations from ARIN
  • Demonstrate at least 90% utilization of any single serving site within your network
  • Has allocated more than 90% of their total address space to serving sites, with the block size allocated to each serving site being justified based on the criteria specified in NRPM 6.5.2
ISP Additional Allocation for Transitional Technology: /24 maximum (see NRPM 6.5.3.1)
  • Provide a detailed plan for using the block to implement an IPv4 to IPv6 transitional technology

Note: These justifications will be reviewed every three years and reclaimed if no longer properly utilized.

Multiple Discrete Networks: /36 upon request (see NRPM 6.11)
  • Be a single entity and not a consortium of smaller independent entities
  • Have compelling criteria for creating discrete networks, such as regulatory restrictions for data transmission, geographic distance and diversity between networks, and autonomous multi-homed discrete networks
  • For each discrete network receiving additional addresses, demonstrate that network meets the standard IPv6 ISP additional allocation requirements

End-user Assignments

An end-user is an organization receiving assignments of IP addresses exclusively for use in its operational networks. ARIN assigns blocks of IP addresses to end-users who request address space for their internal use in running their own networks, but not for sub-delegation of those addresses outside their organization. End-users must meet the requirements described in these guidelines for justifying the assignment of an address block.

For policy information, see Number Resource Policy Manual (NRPM) Section 6.5.8.

For fee information, see ARIN's Fee Schedule.

Initial Requests (see NRPM 6.5.8)

Meet one of the following requirements:

  • Have a previously-justified IPv4 end-user assignment from ARIN or one of its predecessor registries 
  • Currently or plan to immediately become IPv6 multi-homed using an assigned valid global ASN 
  • Have a network that will make active use of a minimum of 2000 IPv6 addresses within 12 months 
  • Have a network that will make active use of a minimum of 200 /64 subnets within 12 months 
  • By having a contiguous network that has a minimum of 13 active sites within 12 months
  • Provide a reasonable technical justification indicating why addresses from an ISP or other LIR are unsuitable

If requesting a block larger than the minimum assignment (/48), provide documentation justifying the need for additional subnets based on the number of sites in the organization’s network within 12 months.

Your initial assignment size will be determined by the number of justified sites your network has, for example:

  • 1 - 12 sites: /44
  • 13 - 192 sites: /40
  • 193 - 3,072 sites: /36
  • 3,073 - 49,152 sites: /32
  • etc.
Additional Requests (see NRPM 6.5.8.3)
  • Show an overall 75% utilization of all previous assignments

Autonomous System Numbers (ASNs)

An Autonomous System (AS) is a group of one or more IP prefixes run by one or more network operators that maintains a single, clearly defined routing policy. An IP prefix is a list of IP addresses that can be reached from that ISP’s network. The network operators must have an ASN to control routing within their networks and to exchange routing information with other ISPs.

If your ISP has informed your organization that you require an ASN, simply submit a request and ARIN will guide you through the rest of the process.

Requirements
Multi-homed (see NRPM 5)
  • Provide the exterior gateway protocol to be used
  • Provide the IP addresses currently in use on your network
  • Provide the ASN and name of each of your ISPs/peers
  • If requesting an additional ASN, provide documentation detailing how the network for the requested ASN is autonomous from each other AS in your network
Unique Routing Policy
  • Demonstrate that your AS's routing policy will differ from the routing policies of its border peers
  • If requesting an additional ASN, provide documentation detailing how the network for the requested ASN is autonomous from each other AS in your network

Experimental Allocations

Experimental Allocations are granted annually, on a lease/license basis, for a period of one year. Upon completion of any experimental activity, all allocated resources are returned to ARIN's free pool, and must be requested again to reallocate. Allocation sizes should align with ARIN minimum allocation sizes, unless a smaller or larger allocation size is thoroughly justified for a particular experiment. ARIN reserves the right to modify or withdraw resources if they are being used for commercial purposes or other activities not documented in the experiment description provided to ARIN.

The policies governing Experimental Internet Resource Allocations can be found in NRPM 11. There are strict criteria to define recognized experimental activity:

  • Objectives and practices are described in a publicly accessible document
  • Outcomes will be published in a publicly accessible document
  • Conditions for concluding the experiment are defined and included in the document
  • Demonstration that the activity is technically coordinated

Submitting Your Request

To better understand how to use ARIN Online to submit a request, visit the Resource Requests: Getting Started page. You may also want to view our Requesting Resources 101 instructional video.

Note: All resource requests require an ARIN Online account linked to either an Admin or Tech Point of Contact record (POC) with the authority to request resources for a valid Organization Identifier (Org ID). For assistance creating a POC record, visit our POC Records page and view the instructional video. You may also want to view our video on Org IDs.

  1. Log into ARIN Online
  2. Select either IP Addresses or ASNs from the ARIN Online navigation bar
  3. Select "Request" from the submenu
  4. Select the appropriate Org ID
  5. Select the appropriate request form
  6. Fill out all required fields and attach all required documentation
    1. ARIN may require detailed contact information, organization and network information, or business plan details to justify a request. ARIN recommends providing as many details as possible, as detailed justification documents may result in fewer correspondence cycles and a smoother request process.
    2. To view some example documentation that may be used as templates when requesting resources, visit the Examples page.

An ARIN resource analyst will review your request (typically within two business days) and reply to either approve your request or request more information. Once all requirements are met, ARIN will approve your request and ask that you pay any applicable fees and submit a signed Registration Services Agreement (RSA) within 60 days. Once ARIN receives a signed RSA and all applicable fees, your resources will be issued within two business days.

If you need a status update on your request or have any questions, please call ARIN Registration Services at 703.227.0660. If you need assistance with paying the registration fee or submitting a signed RSA, please call ARIN Financial Services at 703.227.9886.

Appeals

The Appeals Process allows organizations to appeal an ARIN decision regarding a number resource request if the organization believes that the community-established policies and procedures for the administration and management of Internet number resources were not adhered to.

Reissuing Returned, Revoked, and Reclaimed Resources

There are a number of ways that previously issued number resources can come back to ARIN. IP addresses or ASNs may be revoked for nonpayment of fees, they may be voluntarily returned by the holder, or they may be reclaimed by ARIN in instances of confirmed fraudulent activity or abandonment of resources.

All returned, revoked, and reclaimed IPv4 addresses are held for a period of 60 days prior to being reissued to allow adequate time for the resource to clear any route filters, and to allow an organization the opportunity to pay their overdue fees. This hold period was reduced as part of ARIN's transition into Phase 4 of the IPv4 Countdown Plan.

ARIN will continue to hold IPv6 addresses and ASNs for six months prior to reissue.

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